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Mono

NO. 341 BODIE - Gold was discovered here in 1859 by Wm. S. Bodey, after whom the town was named, and the town became the most thriving metropolis of the Mono country. Bodie's mines produced gold valued at more than 100 million dollars. Today a state park, Bodie is one of the best known of the west's 'ghost towns.'
Location: Bodie State Historic Park, on State Hwy 270, 12.8 mi E of State Hwy 395 (P.M. 69.8), 19.8 mi SE of Bridgeport

NO. 792 DOG TOWN - Site of the first major gold rush to the eastern slope of California's Sierra Nevada, Dog Town derived its name from a popular miners' term for camps with huts or hovels. Ruins lying close to the cliff bordering Dog Town Creek are all that remain of the makeshift dwellings which formed part of the 'diggins' here.
Location: On State Hwy 395 (P.M. 69.5), 7 mi S of Bridgeport

NO. 995-1 TRAIL OF THE JOHN C. FRÉMONT 1884 EXPEDITION - In 1844, while exploring and mapping the area of what is presently the western United States, Lt. John C. Frémont's party passed through northern Mono County during the last week of January. After passing through Mono County, Frémont passed over the Sierra and travelled to Sutter's Fort in the Sacramento Valley, where the party rested. To leave California the expedition headed south through the San Joaquin Valley, and then headed easterly to leave California by the Old Spanish Trail to Utah.
Location: Big Bend-Mountain Gate area, Toiyabe National Forest, Bridgeport