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CLG Program Q & A

What is the Certified Local Government Program?

The 1980 amendments to the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, provided for the establishment of a CLG program to encourage the direct participation of local governments in the identification, evaluation, registration, and preservation of historic properties within their jurisdictions and promote the integration of local preservation interests and concerns into local planning and decision-making processes. The CLG program is a partnership among local governments, the State of California-OHP, and the National Park Service (NPS) which is responsible for administering the National Historic Preservation Program.


Who can apply to become a CLG?

Any general purpose political subdivision with land-use authority is eligible to become a CLG. It is the local government that is certified, not simply the preservation commission.
What is the certification process?
 
A completed application, signed by the chief elected official of the applying local government, will be reviewed by OHP. If the applicant meets the criteria, OHP will forward the application and recommend certification to the NPS who makes the final cerification decision. When the NPS is in agreement with OHP's recommendation, a certification agreement is signed by OHP and the local government, completing the certification process. 

What are the requirements to be a CLG?

CLGs must comply with five basic requirements:
  • Enforce appropriate state and local laws and regulations for the designation and protection of historic properties;
  • Establish an historic preservation review commission by local ordinance;
  • Maintain a system for the survey and inventory of historic properties;
  • Provide for public participation in the local preservation program; and
  • Satisfactorily perform responsibilities delegated to it by the state.


Why become a CLG?

 What’s in it for the local jurisdiction? Why would you want to associate your local preservation program with state and federal programs? Would you be giving up autonomy?