Pending Nominations

Pending Nominations

Pursuant to Section 4855(a) of the California Code of Regulations California Register of Historical Resources (Title 14, Chapter 11.5), the following nominations are scheduled for the November 3, 2023 State Historical Resources Commission (SHRC) quarterly meeting, taking place at 9:00 AM at the Stanley Mosk Library and Courts Building, Room 500, 914 Capitol Mall, Sacramento, CA, 95814. This meeting will also be held online via Zoom, and broadcast via Cal-Span. Dial-in access will also be available. Meeting notices and agendas will be posted ten days prior to the meeting date, and a Zoom link will be posted on approximately the same date to register for this meeting.

Watch the meeting on CAL-SPAN if you wish to view the meeting but do not wish to provide public testimony.

Register via Zoom to attend the November 3, 2023 SHRC Meeting via this link if you wish to provide public testimony at the meeting.

The SHRC invites comments on the nominations from the public either in writing or at the scheduled public meeting. Copies of nominations are posted as PDF documents below. Written comments can be sent to: State Historical Resources Commission, P.O. Box 942896, Sacramento, CA 94296-0001.

The order of comments for nominations under consideration during the Discussion and Action portion on the agenda will proceed as follows: The Commission will first hear from the nominator or his/her/their designee. The nominator or his/her/their designee will have ten (10) minutes to speak. The Commission will then hear from the property owner(s) or his/her/their designee. Each property owner or his/her/their designee of an individually nominated property will have ten (10) minutes to speak. Each property owner or his/her/their designee whose property is within the boundaries of a nominated district will have five (5) minutes to speak. Individuals representing local, state, federal, and tribal governments, will each have five (5) minutes to speak. Any member of the general public will have three (3) minutes to speak. Those members of the public who require a translator will be allocated twice the time otherwise defined. Within this stated order of commenters, those in the room will be heard from first and then those participating via Zoom or telephone.

Those providing comments about nominations that are on Consent or comments related to other matters not pertaining to nominations will each have three (3) minutes to speak.

Media presentations shall be submitted at least 48 hours prior to the meeting and shall not go beyond the allowable time frame for the applicable comment period.



PLEASE NOTE

Complete and official listing of nominated properties scheduled for hearing at the above mentioned SHRC Meeting can be found on the meeting agenda via the SHRC Meeting Schedule and Notices page. The nominations on this page may not reflect the most current properties listed on the agenda.

Properties can be removed from the agenda by the State Historic Preservation Officer or the State Historical Resources Commission. No properties can be added to the agenda.

National Register of Historic Places nominations are considered drafts until listed by the Keeper.

California Register of Historical Resources nominations are considered drafts until listed or formally determined eligible for listing by the State Historical Resources Commission.

Calfornia Historical Landmarks and Points of Historical Interest are considered drafts until approved for listing by the State Historical Resources Commission and the Director of California State Parks.


 

Properties nominated to the National Register of Historic Places

PHOTO Belden-Birkhofer House, in Guerneville, Sonoma County, was constructed between 1919 and 1922 and designed by the architecture firm Miller & Warnecke of Oakland, California. The building was constructed in the Mission Revival style for Ralph A. and M. Gretchen (Ungewitter) Belden. The house was later sold to Oscar and Laura Birkhofer who lived there for almost 40 years.

PHOTO Allen, Clifford, House, is located on the Stanford University campus, in Santa Clara County. The house was constructed in 1914 and built in the First Bay Tradition style, with Craftsman elements, and designed by a locally prominent master architect, John K. Branner. The period of significance spans from 1914-1939, beginning with the construction of the original design by Branner, and ending with the construction of additions designed by another prominent local architect, Birge Clark

PHOTO Sierra City School is a vernacular wooden schoolhouse located in Sierra City, an unincorporated community of Sierra County, adacent to Highway 49. Built in 1889, it was the principal education facility of this mountain community until it closed in 1954. In addition to being the center of education, the school also served as a local community center.

 

PHOTO Western Manufacturing Company is a 1923 building located in the South of Market neighborhood of San Francisco, significant for its architecture as a high style industrial building, featuring polychrome brickwork and other architectural details that stands out compared to its neighbors. The property was designed by builder Sam Schell.

 

PHOTO Hollywood Bowl, an open-air amphitheater nestled in the natural south hillside of Bolton Canyon above busy Hollywood Boulevard, in the Hollywood neighborhood of the City of Los Angeles. In a location selected for its natural acoustics, the venue is defined by its natural setting surrounded by chapparal-covered terrain, a cultural landscape dominated by Bolton Canyon and the relationship with the Seating and Stage Area set within the canyon. The Hollywood Bowl built a wide, broad-based audience for arts and culture in Los Angeles during the early to mid-twentieth century and established outdoor performances in a natural setting as a uniquely Southern California experience.

 A. Quincy Jones Barn, referred to more simply as the Barn, was constructed in 1949 with alterations in 1965. The L-shaped, wood-frame construction was designed in the manner of a New England barn. From 1949 to 1965, the building served as the studio of photographers Mary Mead Maddick and Tamis Maddick. From 1965 to 1979, the building served as the home and teaching studio of master architect and educator, A. Quincy Jones, FAIA. The rare example of his adaptive reuse of a pre-existing building received national and international recognition.

PHOTO Ridgewood Place Historic District, located near the Windsor Square area of Los Angeles, is a two-block long, single-family residential district, developed as a single tract between 1911 and 1921. Resources were constructed primarily in the Colonial Revival style, with the Tudor Revival, Mediterranean Revival, and Craftsman styles also represented. The district, an excellent example of a Los Angeles streetcar suburb, is located within walking distance from major streetcar corridors of the Los Angeles Railway on Beverly Boulevard and Western Avenue.

PHOTO St. Andrews Square Historic District is an irregularly shaped four-block primarily residential district located near the Wilshire Center area of central Los Angeles. Multi-family resources in the district are generally compatible in scale with the single-family resources. The district was developed as multiple tracts in close proximity to Los Angeles Railway streetcar lines. Most buildings are constructed in the Bungalow/Craftsman style, with the Prairie School, Colonial Revival, Mission/Spanish Colonial Revival, Mediterranean Revival, Tudor Revival, and Minimal Traditional styles also represented.

PHOTO Yoshiko Yamanouchi House, located in a San Mateo residential neighborhood, includes three buildings, three structures, and three sites. The Ranch Style house and its associated resources (1957), Japanese style hill-and-pond garden (1958), and the Katsura Building, Walkway, and Garden (1968) create an ensemble of designed landscape and architectural features whose character reflects both suburban residential design from the post-World II era and traditional Japanese style architecture and garden design. The property is associated with Yoshiko Yamanouchi, a member of the pioneer Issei generation who was a leader in the San Mateo Japanese American community.

Properties to be removed from the National Register of Historic Places

PHOTO Headquarters Administration Building in Big Basin Redwoods State Park was one of the best examples of an administrative facility constructed between 1933 and 1942 and demonstrated an association with the public works programs that oversaw and administratively controlled the development of facilities within state parks during this period. Due to the 2020 CZU Lightening Complex wildfire, the building was destroyed leaving only the original fireplace, chimney, and stone steps. The fireplace and chimney were later cleared for public safety. The property has ceased to meet the criteria for listing in the National Register because the association and features that made it originally eligible have been lost or destroyed.

PHOTO Lower Sky Meadow Residential Area in Big Basin Redwoods State Park was the first residential complex built in a California state park between 1941 and 1955, an era when the construction of employee housing in California State Parks became a priority and standardized plans were utilized in the parks for the first time. Due to the 2020 CZU Lightening Complex wildfire, the district was nearly destroyed. The tree lined road and Residence 10 are all that remains of the historic district. The property has ceased to meet the criteria for listing in the National Register because the association and features that made it originally eligible have been lost or destroyed.

Properties nominated to the California Register of Historical Resources

PHOTO Ruth Nelson Taylor House in Laguna Beach is a two-story, Mid-Century Modern style, Expressionist/Organic subtype residence configured in a rectangular plan. The closed appearance to the street contrasts with an open orientation to expansive views and its close relationship to the hillside site. The residence was completed in 1962, designed by architect Donald E. (Bud) Evenson. His executed, independent single-family residential design work between 1961 and 1966, before he became a licensed architect, represents a discrete period of audacious experimentation—bold shapes and distinctive volumes, clad in simple materials, on challenging hillside lots (some with ocean views)—and expressed a dynamism not found in his later career.

Properties being nominated as California Points of Historical Interest

PHOTO Site of Headquarters Administration Building documents the ruins of the Big Basin Redwoods State Park Visitors Center that remain after the 2020 CZU Lighting Complex Fire. A request to remove the historic building from the National Register of Historic Places is under review, with this Point of Historical Interest nomination intended to capture the history and significance associated with the contributions of the Civilian Conservation Corps in Big Basin Redwoods State Park and in California State Parks.

PHOTO Site of Lower Sky Meadow Residential Area in Big Basin Redwoods State Park documents the lone residence and tree-lined Lower Sky Meadow Lane that survived the 2020 CZU Lighting Complex Fire. A request to remove the historic district from the National Register of Historic Places is under review, with this Point of Historical Interest nomination intended to capture the history and significance associated with development in Big Basin Redwoods State Park and in California State Parks.


The next State Historical Resources Commission meeting is scheduled for Friday, November 3, 2023.  Nominations to be heard on the November 3, 2023 agenda will be posted after September 5, 2023.